Food and Behaviour Research

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The UN Decade of Nutrition, the NOVA food classification and the trouble with ultra-processing

Monteiro CA, Cannon G, Moubarac JC, Levy RB, Louzada MLC, Jaime PC (2018) Public Health Nutr.  2018 Jan;21(1): 5-17. doi: 10.1017/S1368980017000234. 

Web URL: Read this and related abstracts on PubMed here

Abstract:

Given evident multiple threats to food systems and supplies, food security, human health and welfare, the living and physical world and the biosphere, the years 2016-2025 are now designated by the UN as the Decade of Nutrition, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. For these initiatives to succeed, it is necessary to know which foods contribute to health and well-being, and which are unhealthy.

The present commentary outlines the NOVA system of food classification based on the nature, extent and purpose of food processing. Evidence that NOVA effectively addresses the quality of diets and their impact on all forms of malnutrition, and also the sustainability of food systems, has now accumulated in a number of countries, as shown here. A singular feature of NOVA is its identification of ultra-processed food and drink products. These are not modified foods, but formulations mostly of cheap industrial sources of dietary energy and nutrients plus additives, using a series of processes (hence 'ultra-processed'). All together, they are energy-dense, high in unhealthy types of fat, refined starches, free sugars and salt, and poor sources of protein, dietary fibre and micronutrients. Ultra-processed products are made to be hyper-palatable and attractive, with long shelf-life, and able to be consumed anywhere, any time. Their formulation, presentation and marketing often promote overconsumption.

Studies based on NOVA show that ultra-processed products now dominate the food supplies of various high-income countries and are increasingly pervasive in lower-middle- and upper-middle-income countries. The evidence so far shows that displacement of minimally processed foods and freshly prepared dishes and meals by ultra-processed products is associated with unhealthy dietary nutrient profiles and several diet-related non-communicable diseases. Ultra-processed products are also troublesome from social, cultural, economic, political and environmental points of view.

We conclude that the ever-increasing production and consumption of these products is a world crisis, to be confronted, checked and reversed as part of the work of the UN Sustainable Development Goals and its Decade of Nutrition.

FAB RESEARCH COMMENT:

See also this recent open-access report from the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems, explaining in detail how industrial food and farming systems are “making people sick” and fuelling the obesity crisis.

For a detailed explanation of 'ultra-processed foods', this open access paper from World Nutrition - the Journal of the World Public Health Nutrition Association is freely downloadable here:

See also: