Food and Behaviour Research

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Vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels predict different outcomes in early Parkinson's disease

Christine CW, Auinger P, Joslin A, Yelpaala Y, Green R (2018) Mov Disord.  2018 Mar 6.  doi: 10.1002/mds.27301. [Epub ahead of print] 

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND:

In moderately advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), low serum vitamin B12 levels are common and are associated with neuropathy and cognitive impairment. However, little is known about B12 in early PD.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of low vitamin B12 status in early PD and whether it is associated with clinical progression.

METHODS:

We measured vitamin B12 and other B12 status determinants (methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, and holotranscobalamin) in 680 baseline and 456 follow-up serum samples collected from DATATOP participants with early, untreated PD. Borderline low B12 status was defined as serum B12 15 µmol/L. Outcomes included the UPDRS, ambulatory capacity score (sum of UPDRS items 13-15, 29&30), and MMSE, calculated as annualized rates of change.

RESULTS:

At baseline, 13% had borderline low B12 levels, 7% had elevated homocysteine, whereas 2% had both. Elevated homocysteine at baseline was associated with worse scores on the baseline MMSE. Analysis of study outcomes showed that compared with the other tertiles, participants in the low B12 tertile (

CONCLUSIONS:

In this study of early PD, low B12 status was common. Low B12 at baseline predicted greater worsening of mobility whereas elevated homocysteine predicted greater cognitive decline. Given that low B12 and elevated homocysteine can improve with vitamin supplementation, future studies should test whether prevention or early correction of these nutritionally modifiable conditions slows development of disability. © 2018 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

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