Food and Behaviour Research

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A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination

Black LJ, Rowley C, Sherriff J, Pereira G, Ponsonby AL, Lucas RM (2018) Mult Scler.  2018 Aug: 1352458518793524. doi: 10.1177/1352458518793524. [Epub ahead of print] 

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Abstract:

BACKGROUND:

The evidence associating diet and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated associations between dietary patterns and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, a common precursor to multiple sclerosis.

METHODS:

We used data from the 2003-2006 Ausimmune Study, a case-control study examining environmental risk factors for a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, with participants matched on age, sex and study region. Using data from a food frequency questionnaire, dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Conditional logistic regression models ( n = 698, 252 cases, 446 controls) were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting.

RESULTS:

We identified two major dietary patterns - healthy (high in poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes) and Western (high in meat, full-fat dairy; low in wholegrains, nuts, fresh fruit, low-fat dairy), explaining 9.3% and 7.5% of variability in diet, respectively. A one-standard deviation increase in the healthy pattern score was associated with a 25% reduced risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (adjusted odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.60, 0.94; p = 0.011). There was no statistically significant association between the Western dietary pattern and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination.

FAB RESEARCH COMMENT:

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